Encounter with an aardvark

When I was a schoolboy we did not have many books at home. As a result I spent a lot of time reading those which were available to me. One of them was a middle-sized dictionary. It is perhaps not surprising that I attached a special significance to the first word which was defined in that dictionary. At that time it was usual, and I see it as reasonable, that articles did not belong to the list of words which the dictionary was responsible for defining. For this reason ‘a’ was not the first word on the list and instead it was ‘aardvark’. From the dictionary I learned that an aardvark is an animal and roughly what kind of animal it is. I also learned something about its etymology (it was an etymological dictionary) and that it originates from Dutch words meaning ‘earth’ and ‘pig’. Later in life I saw pictures of aardvarks in books and saw them in TV programmes, but without paying special attention to them. The aardvark remained more of an intriguing abstraction for me than an animal.

Yesterday, in Saarbrücken zoo, I walked into a room and saw an aardvark in front of me. Suddenly the abstraction turned into a very concrete animal pacing methodically around its enclosure. I had a certain feeling of unreality. I do not know if aardvarks always walk like that or whether it was just a habit which this individual had acquired by being confined to a limited space. Each time it returned (reappearing after having disappeared into a region not visible to me) the impression of unreality was heightened. I was reminded of the films of dinosaurs which sometimes come on TV, where the computer-reconstructed movements of the animals look very unrealistic to me. Seeing the aardvark I asked myself, ‘if mankind only knew this animal from fossil remains would it ever have been possible to reconstruct the gait I now see before me?’

As a schoolboy I read that dictionary a lot but I did not read it from beginning to end. For comparison, I am reading the autobiography ‘On the Move: A Life’ of Oliver Sacks and he tells the following story. As a student he won a cash prize and used the money to buy a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary in 12 volumes. He read it from beginning to end. I do feel a certain sympathy for him in this matter but it is an example of the fact that he seems to have been excessive in many things, to an extent which creates a distance between him and me. The book is well written and contains a lot of very good stories and I can recommend it. Nevertheless it is not one of those autobiographies which leads me to identify with the author or to admire them greatly. At this point I have only read about a quarter of the book and so my impression may yet change. I had previously read some of his books with pleasure, ‘Awakenings’, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat’ and ‘An Anthropologist on Mars’ and it was interesting to learn more about the man behind the books.

Another animal I encountered in the Saarbrücken zoo is a species whose existence I did not know of before. This is Pallas’s cat. This is a wild cat with a very unusual and engaging look. The name Pallas has a special meaning for me for the following reason. When I was young and a keen birdwatcher some of the birds which were most exciting for me were rare vagrants from Siberia which had been brought to Europe by unusual weather conditions. A number of these are named after Pallas. I knew almost nothing about the man Pallas. Now I have filled in some background. In particular I learned that he was a German born in Berlin who was sent on expeditions to Siberia by Catherine the Great.

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