Archive for July, 2019

SMB meeting in Montreal

July 27, 2019

This week I have been attending the SMB meeting in Montreal. There was a minisymposium on reaction networks and I gave a talk there on my work with Elisenda Feliu and Carsten Wiuf on multistability in the multiple futile cycle. There were also other talks related to that system. A direction which was new to me and was discussed in a talk by Elizabeth Gross was using a sophisticated technique from algebraic geometry (the mixed volume) to obtain an upper bound on the number of complex solutions of the equations for steady states for a reaction network (which is then of course also an upper bound for the number of positive real solutions). There were two talks about the dynamics of complex balanced reaction networks with diffusion. I have the impression that there remains a lot to be understood in that area.

At this conference the lecture rooms were usually big enough. An exception was the first session ‘mathematical oncology from bench to bedside’ which was completely overfilled and had to move to a different room. In that session there was a tremendous amount of enthusiasm. There is now a subgroup of the SMB for cancer modelling which seems to be very active with its own web page and blog. I should join that subgroup. Some of the speakers were so full of energy and so extrovert that it was a bit much for me. Nevertheless, it is clear that this is an exciting area and I would like to be part of it. There was also a session of cancer immunotherapy led by Vincent Lemaire from Genentech. He and two others described the mathematical modelling being done in cancer immunotherapy in three major pharmaceutical companies (Genentech, Pfizer and Glaxo-Smith-Kline). These are very big models. Lemaire said that at the moment that there are 2500 clinical trials going on for therapies related to PD-1. A recurring theme in these talks was the difference between mice and men.

This morning there was a talk by Hassan Jamaleddine concerning nanoparticles used to present antigen. These apparently primarily stimulate Tregs more than effector T cells and can thus be used as a therapy for autoimmune diseases. He showed some impressive pictures illustrating clearance of EAE using this technique. A central theme was interference between attempts to use the technique in animals with two autoimmune diseases in different organs, e.g. brain and liver. I was interested by the fact that for what he was doing steady state analysis was insufficient for understanding the biology.

This afternoon, the conference being over, I took to opportunity to visit Paul Francois at McGill, a visit which was well worthwhile.