Book on cancer therapy using immune checkpoints, part 2

I now finished reading the book of Graeber I wrote about in the last post. Here are some additional comments. Chapter 7 is about CAR T cells, a topic which I wrote about briefly here. I also mentioned in that post that there is a mathematical model related to this in the literature but I have not got around to studying it. Chapter 8 is a summary of the present state of cancer immunotherapy while the last chapter is mainly concerned with an individual case where PD-1 therapy showed a remarkable success but the patient, while against all odds still alive, is still not cancer-free. It should not be forgotten that the impressive success stories in this field are accompanied by numerous failures and the book also reports at length on what these failures can look like for individual patients.

For me the subject of this book is the most exciting topic in medicine I know at the moment. It is very dynamic with numerous clinical studies taking place. It is suggested in the book that there is a lot of redundancy in this and correspondingly a lot of waste, financial and human. My dream is that progress in this area could be helped by more theoretical input. What do I mean by progress? There are three directions which occur to me. (1) Improving the proportion of patients with a given type of cancer who respond by modifying a therapy or replacing it by a different one. (2) Identifying in advance which patients with a given type of cancer will respond to which therapy, so as to allow rational choices between therapies in individual cases. (3) Identifying new types of cancer which are promising targets for a given therapy. By theoretical input I mean getting a better mechanistic understanding of the ways in which given therapies work and using that to obtain a better understanding of the conditions needed for success. The dream goes further with the hope that this theoretical input could be improved by the formulation and analysis of mathematical models.

What indications are there that this dream can lead to something real? I have already mentioned one mathematical model related to CAR T-cells. I have mentioned a mechanistic model for PD-1 by Mellman and collaborators here. This has been made into a mathematical model in a 2018 article by Arulraj and Barik (PLoS ONE 13(10): e0206232). There is a mathematical model for CTLA-4 by Jansson et al. (J. Immunol. 175, 1575) and it has been extended to model the effects of related immunotherapy in a 2018 paper of Ganesan et al. (BMC Med. Inform. Decis. Mak. 18,37).

I conclude by discussing one topic which is not mentioned in the book. In Mainz (where I live) there is a company called BIONTECH with 850 employees whose business is cancer immunotherapy. The CEO of the company is Ugur Sahin, who is also a professor at the University of Mainz. I have heard a couple of talks by him, which were on a relatively general level. I did not really understand what his speciality is, only that it has something to do with mRNA. I now tried to learn some more about this and I realised that there is a relation to a topic mentioned in the book, that of cold and hot tumours. The most favourable situation for immune checkpoint therapies is where a tumour does in principle generate a strong immune response and has adapted to switch that off. Then the therapy can switch it back on. This is the case of a hot tumour, which exhibits a lot of mutations and where enough of these mutations are visible to the immune system. By contrast for a cold tumour, with no obvious mutations, there is no basis for the therapy to work on. The idea of the type of therapy being developed by Sahin and collaborators is as follows (my preliminary understanding). First analyse DNA and RNA from the tumour of a patient to identify existing mutations. Then try to determine by bioinformatic methods which of these mutations could be presented effectively by the MHC molecules of the patients. This leads to candidate proteins which might stimulate the immune system to attack the tumour cells. Now synthesise mRNA coding for those proteins and use it as a vaccine. The results of the first trials of this technique are reported in a 2017 paper in Nature 547, 222. It has 295 citations in Web of Science which indicates that it has attracted some attention.

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